Megan Ransley

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Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 19 total)
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  • in reply to: Hoist sling application by one carre #4735
    Megan Ransley
    Participant

    Sure do. Copy and paste this one.

    in reply to: Hoist sling application by one carre #4733
    Megan Ransley
    Participant

    Hi Ann,
    Are they prepared to log roll if space available? If so you can get the slings to fold into a pretty tight little package like so… then with a roll get it in quite central for the return roll. The fold can assist with the dreaded strap tangle when trying to get a sling situated just right. I find it works best with a padded sling as it doesn’t bunch. Folding a padded sling

    in reply to: Bariatric new build specs #4724
    Megan Ransley
    Participant

    Hi Julie and Co.
    A link here to forProject Doc Molift the Molift planning doc, it covers layout and product choice for ceiling hoisting.

    Most of the big lifting supply companies will have this kind of doc but also the expertise to assist with putting their most appropriate bariatric lifting equipment forward for the proposed space. I think all suppliers would agree though that if you are planning a build… get the clinicians, the clinical engineers and the supplier into a conversation (preferably in the same room) early. It can really help to solve problems on paper. Retrofits are always possible but are more challenging.

    In terms of bariatric lifting the 500kg single motor rail system and or the 350 are the couple to look at from Molift via Morton&Perry. Happy to pass on the info for those via PDF if thats of interest.

    in reply to: Bed Rope Ladder #4602
    Megan Ransley
    Participant

    Hi guys.
    Morton and Perry do a bed ladder from the Immedia manual handling range. It’s a Swedish product and confusingly called the bed string.
    https://www.etac.com/en-gb/products/manual-transfer/support/immedia-bedstring/

    in reply to: Comfort chairs can they be seen as a restraint #4431
    Megan Ransley
    Participant

    Hi Ann,
    Answering a side question within your post above. I worked for a residential facility as their Physio for a wee while and found the tilt in space was helpful to prevent sliding and that in turn useful for skin protection. In a audit of range of motion for our comfort chair users I found that many of the (dementia included) users were also having the leg rest raised too. Lazy boy type style. The staff were so used to raising the footrest with those comfort chairs that in one smooth move the resident was tipped back and legs up “secured” for whatever activity was taking place. The chairs own functions were in this case trapping the client.

    The issue there was (and one feeds back on the other here) many residents had short hamstrings. When a person is asked to extend the knee with the hip in flexion (sitting with legs out in front) the hamstring requires length. Especially if a person is off their feet. If no length in the hamstring then the only choice is actually for both knees and hips to flex more and even wind sweep then the client slides down into the bottom of the chair where they get stuck. Range of motion continues to get worse as the days go on. There is no getting out of the bottom of a comfort chair if you have slid down and don’t have the range of motion to get out. So that is a form of restraint I think, because had the chair been fitted with hamstring relief rather than leg extension the chances of moving independently would be much improved and on going range of motion could be retained.

    in reply to: Seated positioning system #4392
    Megan Ransley
    Participant

    Totally agree with the above post from Ellen. If one can avoid and prevent the slide then it’s a win.

    The Vela chair from Morton&Perry might be of interest to the people posting here. Its for the more active client but one who finds a regular dining type chair unhelpful for sitting. One needs support and good friction (thighs, lateral trunk, tilt) to assist an upright and active posture, the traditional table chair is just useless on this front once body tone is diminished. Tilt both posterior and anterior. Elevate for foot positioning, adjustable arms that are low enough to go under tables or flip away, excellent well fitting back and thigh support etc. The Vela chair can give people the ability to engage in activities and meals where a ordinary or large positioning chair cant. Please let me know if you would like more info. I think these might fit a need not yet explored in NZ, I’ve had good success with these chairs for all sorts of people.

    http://www.mortonperry.co.nz/indoor-activity-chairs_1.html

    On the, we tried everything but just cant prevent the sliding… we offer this solution. The one way glides. Use with caution, one must take steps to mitigate shear (Educate staff on the dangers of shear and use of a glide glove to allow the skin on the bottom to “release” once repositioned) but they can be very good.

    https://www.etac.com/en-gb/products/manual-transfer/positioning-sitting/immedia-onewayglide/

    in reply to: Using the molift belt #4363
    Megan Ransley
    Participant

    Hi Jessie.
    Being the Molift rep in central north.. I do this all the time and have got it down to an art! That said it does take some practice. One wants to hook the static side of the strap on quite close to the unit so that by the end of the move there inst heaps of belt run through the sliding sleeve to the other side. That closer hook on the static side keeps you as the helper closer to the whole situation by the end of the move.
    Also it is possible to have the strap without the sliding sleeve which I think is not making the best of it. One really wants to two parts to work together to get it all to run smooth for assisted standing.
    There is a new belt and raiser (the pro) only just on the market. It is featured in the link above that you posted. I don’t think its in CHCH yet…. The belt can make a good difference in terms of the user feeling a bit more secure (it buckles and has a wide non slip fabric) and one wont have to have a separate sleeve and strap as its all intergrated. I think its better. The belt is to guide movement, initiate really and then on the way down to control if things are getting a bit wild in terms of touch down speed.
    I know the CHCH Molift rep Ian would happily show you the how to on the new gear if you wanted to get hands on with it.

    in reply to: Theatre case moving and handling #4328
    Megan Ransley
    Participant

    Hi guys,

    I have used this scoop stretcher with good success to move a client from floor to trolley or bed. It goes through the MRI machines too if needed.
    A floor hoist (or ceiling) can be used and the 300kg Mover is able to get around legs of theater tables generally. We have this system working in many DHBs and also in Morgues where regular slings are not useful.

    https://www.etac.com/products/hoists-and-slings/mobile-hoists/molift-mover-300/
    and
    https://www.etac.com/products/hoists-and-slings/stretchers/molift-stretcher/

    in reply to: Moving and Handling Conference #4317
    Megan Ransley
    Participant

    Hi Rebecca,
    Good news Anne is onto that. I have forwarded her the presentation and she mentioned you as her next move to get it uploaded. I imagine she will be in touch shortly.

    Thanks so much.

    in reply to: Moving and Handling Conference #4296
    Megan Ransley
    Participant

    Hi Anne and Julia.
    I think Anne I have your email address so will send that through no trouble. Julia where is best to send to you? Its not huge but too big to post here..

    in reply to: Moving and Handling Conference #4293
    Megan Ransley
    Participant

    Hi Julia,

    I just attended the ASTNZ conference in Auckland last week. There were loads of talks etc going on. I went to a interesting talk on manual handling with reduced care hours. Seemed quite relevant since we faced many care hours recently being reduced here in NZ. Not super relevant for hospital level care but I found it relevant to the community role.
    I can send you the power point if you fancy, might be of use?
    Meg

    in reply to: Maternity question #4079
    Megan Ransley
    Participant

    Hi Julie,
    This is essentially what we did with Angela Greetham at Whakatane hospital with a regular mesh sling and a in that case a floor hoist instead of manual lift. We had to use a floor hoist there as the walls and ceiling were not up to fixing a ceiling gantry system and the ward wanted the hoist to cover the ward too. Gantry would be ideal space wise for sure and four point H system would be the tip top for positioning and avoiding the gantry legs. The pool at Whakatane was pretty deep so a manual lift was just out of the question really.

    in reply to: Turning resident with one carer #4071
    Megan Ransley
    Participant

    Hi Ann,

    So I have had some success with the bed management system with one carer turning. It is basically a system that stays on the bed and the sheets etc are made on top of it. One doesn’t need to take it in and out… its always there ready to be used. Its two very low friction surfaces which allow the person to be moved easily with one carer in any direction. It can be used alone or with a ceiling or a floor hoist. Floor hoist slightly more planning getting the hoist in position over the bed but basically the hoist provides the power to aid a turn. The system has a slide-on brake which means when one doesn’t want the client on the low friction surface it can become a regular surface. Its used in combination with positioning wedges to support someone in side lying
    Check it out here.. probably best explained via a video. This from the English suppliers.

    Bed management system
    Twin sheet

    This a link to the manufactures, Morton&Perry distribute this in NZ
    Immedia bed management

    My understanding is that yes indeed people do still require regular turns even if on air mattresses.

    in reply to: Single Handed Care #4068
    Megan Ransley
    Participant

    Hi Debra, no probs to send that info on. The Forum cant accept an attachment so I will need to email that through. What is the best email address for you?

    in reply to: Maternity question #4066
    Megan Ransley
    Participant

    Hi all,

    Just a note on this one. Molift now have a four point gantry system that does not need to fix into walls or ceiling It can freestand with four posts tucked into the corners of the room. It wont cause a trip hazard like other 2 footed gantries. The H rail moves inside the frame so it has a good lifting window. One can have a lower cost entry level motor if its an occasional use situation or a larger 350kg motor if its to get more and varied use.

    This could easily fit over a pool and the engineering need is minimal

    Quattro hoist

    Megan Ransley
    Physiotherapist
    Megan@mortonperry.co.nz

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 19 total)